3 Must-Have Apps for Any Linux OS, And My Preferences

posted in: Linux | 14

Kate text editor for KDE

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of different GNU/Linux distributions available right now. They are all different in terms of used kernel versions, desktop environments, window managers and set of applications. But all of them have something in common. Whatever OS you use, you must have following three types of applications.

Luckily, most Linux distributions include these applications by default, but you also should know the options.

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Apps to Do Everything Social in Linux

posted in: Linux, Social Media | 5

Social media has permeated nearly every aspect of the web, and people are more social than ever without seeing their contacts face-to-face. To keep up with this social activity, many people have several devices, including computers, mobile phones, and even gaming consoles. If you happen to have a computer running Linux, there is no reason to be left out of the social loop. Linux has a number of social tools to help you stay connected.

Choqok Twitter app in KDE

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Linux and the Dual Monitor Dilemma

posted in: KDE, Linux | 6
My old desktop from 2009
My old dual-screen desktop from 2009

This has been an ongoing issue for me.  Not all Linux desktop environments respond the same to dual monitor hardware configurations, and not all of them function well when it involves a laptop.

For years I have favored KDE’s desktop workspace, partially because of its superior set of options for dual monitors.  You can set the primary monitor, tell KDE to follow the mouse when starting an app so that it opens on the right screen, and even configure separate desktops and widgets for each screen.

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Simulating Two-Finger Scrolling in Linux

posted in: Linux | 3

Finger hovering over laptop touchpad

Ubuntu (and possibly your Linux distribution) comes with support for notebook/netbook touchpads. If you are a laptop person, you probably have a love/hate relationship with your touchpad or trackpad. You might love finger-tapping to simulate your button-pressing, or you might hate it. Similarly, two-finger scrolling is something I have come to love, but others out there might despise it. It depends on your preferences (and possibly the width of your finger – more on that later).
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How to Configure Linux for Children

posted in: Linux | 0

Girl on Linux computer playing TuxPaintMany people still cling to the notion that Linux is for 30-year-old male geeks. While that may be true, there are plenty of other people of all ages, ethnicities, and genders who enjoy Linux and other free and open source software.

For the most part, the operating systems a child uses are determined by the child’s parents and school. As the parent and Linux user yourself, you may prefer your child to use Linux at home.

One feature of Linux desktop environments like KDE and Gnome is that they are extremely customizable. You can have one panel, two panels, or no panel at all. Just as easily as icons, menus, and widgets can appear, they can also disappear.

For that reason, you may find it necessary to set parameters for your children when using Linux. Whether you need tools to lockdown the desktop or filter Internet content, there is free software out there to help you. What follows is a short guide to preparing a Linux desktop for a child, complete with game recommendations.

Read the rest at MakeTechEasier.com